The Science of Improvement

As part a long-term commitment to my larger community, I am honoured to be chosen to take part in a series of credited certifications to assist in improving quality, safety, and value in healthcare in my community through an approached called the Science of Improvement. Though this program is rooted in the medical environment, its application crosses organizational and leadership boundaries.

The Science of Improvement is an applied science that emphasizes innovation, rapid-cycle testing in the field, and spread in order to generate learning about what changes, in which contexts, produce improvements. It is characterized by the combination of expert subject knowledge with improvement methods and tools. It is multidisciplinary — drawing on clinical science, systems theory, psychology, statistics, and other fields.As part a long-term commitment to my larger community, I am taking part in a series of accredited certifications to assist in improving quality, safety, and value in healthcare through an approached called the Science of Improvement.

Certifications include:

  • Improvement Capability – How to improve with the Model for Improvement, Testing and measuring change with PDSA cycles, Interpreting data, Leading quality improvement, Planning for spread: Local improvements to system-wide change, Building safer more reliable systems, Quality improvement practicum
  • Patient Safety – From error to harm, human factors and safety, teamwork and communication in a culture of safety, Responding to adverse events, Root cause and system analysis, Building a culture of safety, Partnering to heal (teaming up against healthcare-associated infections,
  • Leadership – An introduction to heath care leadership
  • Person and family-centred care – Introduction to patient-centred care, Key dimensions of patient and family-centred care, Incorporating mindfulness into clinical practice, A guide to shadowing (seeing care through the eyes of patients and families), Having the conversation (basic skills for conversation about end-of-life care)
  • Triple Aim of Populations – Introduction to the triple aims of populations, Improving health equity, Increasing value and reducing waste at the point of care
  • Graduate Medical Education – Why engage trainees in quality and service? A guide to the clinical learning environment review program (CLER), The faculty role: understanding and modelling the fundamentals of quality of safety, The role of didactic learning in quality improvement, Aligning graduate medical education with organizational quality and safety goals, Faculty advisor guide to the quality improvement practicum
  • Educator’s toolkit

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